Members

beyond EPICA

Antarctic Project

Beyond EPICA project aims to:

  • Retrieve a continuous ice core to bedrock in Antarctica, covering the climate history of the Mid Pleistocene Transition and beyond, where glacial/interglacial cycles changed from a 40,000 to a 100,000 yr cyclicity.
  • Derive first high-resolution climate records over the time interval older than 700 kyr.
  • Use the new climate records to constraint the cause of the MPT and long-term carbon cycle-climate feedbacks.

SO-CHIC

Antarctic Project

SO-CHIC (Southern Ocean Carbon and Heat Impact on Climate): To understand and quantify variability of heat and carbon budgets in the Southern Ocean through an investigation of the key processes controlling exchanges between the atmosphere, ocean and sea ice using a combination of observational and modelling approaches.

TiPACCs

Antarctic Project

TiPACCs is a European Horizon 2020 research project investigating the possibility of sudden and large changes in Antarctic Climate Components. Recently, researchers found relatively warm waters below Antarctic ice shelves, indicating that the Antarctic continental shelf seas can tip from a ‘cold’ to a ‘warm’ state.

ARC-SAR

Arctic Project

The overall aim of ARCSAR is to fast‐track uptake of existing innovations and knowledge by practitioners, predict future needs for innovation and knowledge, and identify priorities for security and standardisation across the Arctic and North-Atlantic (ANA) region. The ARCSAR project will establish international best practice and propose innovation platforms for the professional security and emergency response institutions in the Arctic and the North-Atlantic.

Arctic PASSION

Arctic Project

The Arctic is more affected by climate warming than any other region. To monitor the ongoing changes, to predict the evolution of the climate system and to develop mitigation measures, we need a coherent system of Earth Observation.

ArcticHubs

Polar Project

Global drivers, local consequences: Tools for global change adaptation and sustainable development of industrial and cultural Arctic “hubs”. The ArcticHubs Project is an ambitious, multi-disciplinary international collaboration that aims to develop research-led, practice-based solutions to the urgent challenges faced in the Arctic. 

ARICE

Arctic Project

ARICE (Arctic Research Icebreaker Consortium: A strategy for meeting the needs for marine-based research in the Arctic) is project financed by the EU HORIZON2020 RIA Research and Innovation action on the topic “Integrating Activities for Starting Communities”. ARICE joins the efforts of 14 partners from 12 different countries (Germany, Sweden, United Kingdom, Norway, Iceland, France, Italy, Poland, Finland, Denmark, Canada and the United States of America). The project will start on the 1st of January 2018 and will run for 4 years. ARICE is an international cooperation strategy aiming at providing Europe with better capacities for marine-based research in the ice-covered Arctic Ocean.

CAPARDUS

Polar Project

The ongoing climate change in the Arctic causes a reduction of the sea ice cover, which improves access to the region and its resources. As a result new opportunities for development emerge, regarding exploration of natural resources, tourism, transport, and other industries. The EU-funded project CAPARDUS is a coordination and support action aimed at capacity-building to support sustainable development in the Arctic. The project will develop a 'Comprehensive Framework Model' for Arctic standards with a focus on environmental monitoring.

CHARTER

Polar Project

CHARTER is a research project that is funded by the European Union Horizon 2020 Programme. CHARTER grew out of a desire to better understand the processes that have been driving rapid climate and land use changes in the Arctic. The name comes from the project title: Drivers and Feedbacks of Changes in Arctic Terrestrial Biodiversity. The project started in August 2020 and will run for 4 years. CHARTER involves 21 research institutions across 9 countries (see the full list here). 

ECOTIP

Arctic Project

Ecological tipping cascades in the Arctic Seas is a flagship Horizon 2020 research project focusing on understanding and predicting changes in Arctic marine biodiversity and implications for two vitally important marine ecosystem services: fisheries production, which is the economic lifeblood of many Arctic communities, and carbon sequestration, which has important feedbacks to the global climate.

FACE-It

Arctic Project

Glacier fronts and sea ice systems are hotspots of biodiversity. Their retreat will pose threats to Arctic coastal ecosystem function and eventually local livelihoods. The Arctic is a harbinger of the consequences of multiple global and regional environmental change on ecosystems and livelihoods:

iCUPE

Arctic Project

iCUPE – Integrative and Comprehensive Understanding on Polar Environments – answers to ERA-PLANET (European network for observing our changing planet) thematic strand 4 (Polar areas and natural resources). The project is motivated by the fact that the role of polar regions will increase in terms of megatrends such as globalization, new transport routes, demography and use of natural resources. These megatrends have environmental effects and will drastically affect e.g. regional and transported pollutant concentrations. As a consequence, the polar areas face interconnected grand challenges.

INTAROS

Arctic Project

The overall objective of INTAROS is to develop an integrated Arctic Observation System (iAOS) by extending, improving and unifying existing systems in the different regions of the Arctic. INTAROS has a strong multidisciplinary focus, with tools for integration of data from atmosphere, ocean, cryosphere and terrestrial sciences, provided by institutions in Europe, North America and Asia. INTAROS is assessing strengths and weaknesses of existing observing systems – both satellite and in-situ – and contributes with innovative solutions to fill some of the critical gaps in the in situ observing network.

The EU Polar Cluster website is hosted by the European Polar Board, and managed by the British Antarctic Survey.